BC Cancer Agency

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: interactions between malignant and immune cells in ovarian cancer, gene regulatory features in mouse macrophages, and more.

The effort aims to sequence at least 150 animals, plants, and microbes selected for their potential benefits to Canada in the next three years.

The group now plans to run the 32-gene panel in clinical trials to demonstrate its utility and make the case for offering it within Canada's healthcare system.

Homologous recombination deficiency predicted with the HRDetect tool corresponded to favorable breast cancer outcomes after platinum-based chemotherapy.

Beluga Whale Genome

Canadian researchers have sequenced the genome of the beluga whale using samples from a mother-daughter pair, according to the Vancouver Sun.

Researchers used exome and targeted sequencing to find alterations affecting KRAS and other cancer driver genes in a subset of deep infiltrating endometriosis samples.

Using point mutation and structural variant patterns in 133 ovarian cancer cases, researchers identified seven clusters to classify the disease and predict patient outcomes.

A multi-region analysis of medulloblastoma and other tumor types highlighted the dramatic somatic alteration differences that can crop up within a single tumor.

Researchers demonstrated that Strand-seq directional single-cell sequencing can be used to assemble consensus chromosome haplotypes for an individual.

The researchers used whole-genome and single-cell sequencing to study cell migration patterns and clonal diversity, using new single-cell genotyping software.

Pages

Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.