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Laboratory staffing and supply shortages limited patient access to cancer screening tests, and the pandemic decreased the development and validation of new tests.

Ceres plans to develop its Nanotrap technology to isolate undetectable levels of circulating tumor DNA in blood samples from non-small cell lung cancer patients.

Increased incidental detection of clonal hematopoiesis and new considerations for mutations in myelodysplastic precursors herald improved precision medicine strategies.

At the Association for Molecular Pathology annual meeting, cancer researcher William Hahn talked about efforts to map cancer fitness genes at the genome scale.

The company presented new evidence for the sensitivity of its multi-cancer early detection test and robustness of its automated library prep system.

The firm also discussed recent studies comparing its UltraSeek lung cancer assay with more established liquid biopsy tests to detect drug-resistant mutations.

The two firms aim to bring down costs and turnaround time with two newly-launched sequencing tests for respiratory pathogens, RVOP 2 and Explify RPIP.

The group noted that while molecular diagnostics are powerful tools, physicians' enthusiasm for such tests can lead to improper and excessive use.

At an AMP virtual meeting workshop, a Mayo Clinic lab director offered advice on what diseases to include, how to handle VUSs, and other considerations for ECS.

In a conversation at the Association for Molecular Pathology meeting, the directors touched on topics such as test allocation and staffing and reagent shortages.

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Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.