Aarhus University

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.

The researchers found that tumors expressing STAG2 as a biomarker are twice as likely to recur and progress toward muscle invasion and metastasis.

Researchers have sequenced samples from ancient toilets to study past eating habits and health, NPR reports.

The company presented three posters at AACR, two of which demonstrated insights from its circulating DNA monitoring in colorectal and bladder cancers.

Nature Human Behaviour study finds that when women are paper authors, medical articles are more likely to include analysis by gender and sex.

Researchers at Aarhus will use Natera's liquid biopsy assay to monitor colorectal cancer patients after surgery and chemotherapy. 

Denmark-based Arcedi would like to commercialize its technology through a major diagnostic company.

Natera said that this research collaboration and others will help it clinically validate its circulating tumor DNA assay Signatera. 

Scientists reported this week for the first time a Danish reference genome based on the de novo assembly of 150 genomes from 50 family trios.

The new data center will establish a strong foundation for research into the genetic causes of common diseases and how to prevent them.

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Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.