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NCI Director John Niederhuber said last week that the institute plans to expand the Cancer Genome Atlas project to 20 to 25 major tumor types, and to apply next-generation sequencing to at least 100 tumor samples for each of several types of childhood cancers under the TARGET initiative.

In Brief This Week is a Friday column containing news items that our readers may have missed during the week.

The data, which were presented at this year's American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, represent initial findings from the company's in-house effort to knock down multiple genes simultaneously and a collaboration related to multi-drug resistance of cancer cells.

Based on the results of the study, the company has assembled a panel of six protein biomarkers with the ability to detect non-small cell lung cancer in patients with 94 percent sensitivity and 93 percent specificity. The company is hoping to launch the test by 2012.

Snippets: Apr 22, 2009

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Johns Hopkins University's Genetics and Public Policy Center, National Cancer Institute, Santoris, RayBiotech

Attendees heard about the past and future of the Cancer Genome Atlas at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting in Denver this week, as the pilot stage of the project nears completion.

At the AACR meeting in Denver this week, Washington University Genome Sequencing Center Co-director Elaine Mardis said researchers are completing their analysis of the second complete acute myeloid leukemia genome and are gearing up to sequence more AML genomes.

The new budget and stimulus funds will fuel the Genome Atlas, a personalized medicine platform, and more grants to young investigators.

Broad Institute Founder Eric Lander outlined the past and future of cancer genome research this weekend at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting.

The Pace Quickens

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