AACR

The company presented new data from its validation of the PCR-based approach at a conference, citing plans to advance the kit for monitoring and early detection applications.

Participants shared data from head-to-head assay comparisons, reflected on the advancement of NGS and digital PCR methods, and discussed new standardization projects.

Stakeholders increasingly highlight the need for better, more standardized tools to validate and compare liquid biopsy tests, and commercial firms have responded.

Researchers at the AACR meeting this month addressed the lack of diversity in genomic datasets, noting that it could be hurting efforts to reduce cancer deaths.

At the AACR annual meeting last week researchers presented new data on a range of technologies, discussed novel platforms, compared existing tools, and explored new clinical uses.

Presenters highlighted early work that supports the push for a national, systematic effort to elucidate progression from precancerous states to clinical malignancy.

In 19,000 cases reported so far, researchers have gleaned data that enhances understanding of the spectrum of cancer mutations and supports the rationale of ongoing basket trial initiatives.

Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a method called targeted error correction sequencing, or TEC-Seq, to increase liquid biopsy sensitivity.

One speaker cited the success of screening Ashkenazi Jewish women for BRCA mutations, but another said extending testing to a wider population could be harder.

Such analyses can help researchers pinpoint how various cancers evolve and determine the best kinds of tests to use to find certain disease information.

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The US Food and Drug Administration has new guidelines that enable some gene and cell therapies to undergo expedited review, according to the New York Times.

Using gene drives to control invasive species might be too risky, an initial advocate of the approach says.

In Science this week: intellectual property experts argue patent battles such as the one over CRISPR are wasteful, and more.

Researchers have grown tumors in 3D cell cultures to better understand cancer, the Economist reports.