Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

New Products Posted to GenomeWeb: Invitae, Promega, Myriad Genetics, More

Invitae NIPS

Invitae has added non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS) to its offerings and integrated it as part of the firm's carrier screening test. The NIPS test analyzes cell-free DNA to assess whether a pregnancy is at heightened risk for three common chromosomal disorders, including trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) and trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). There is no additional charge for adding microdeletion and sex chromosome analysis. The carrier screen sequences 301 genes linked to serious genetic disorders, and now the same specimen collection kit will also enable NIPS. Invitae will begin accepting NIPS test orders next week.


Promega Maxwell RSC miRNA Plasma, Serum Kit

Promega has launched its Maxwell RSC miRNA Plasma and Serum kit. The firm said that the kit offers oncology and translational researchers a simple and automated protocol to purify circulating RNA — including miRNA — from plasma, serum, and enriched exosomes for techniques such as next-generation sequencing or droplet digital PCR. Researchers can use the kit with Promega's Maxwell RSC and RSC 48 instruments, which the firm said will reduce hands-on time for researchers and provide consistent, high-quality, and amplifiable miRNA. 


Myriad Genetics Prequel

Myriad Genetics commercially launched an enhanced version of the Prequel Prenatal Screen. The enhanced noninvasive prenatal screen analyzes 23 chromosome pairs instead of the standard five chromosomes (13, 18, 21, X and Y) it previously gauged. According to the company, the ability to assess additional chromosomes enhances the test's clinical utility by improving aneuploidy detection by 30 percent. Myriad is combining the NIPS Prequel tests with its Foresight Carrier Screen and is marketing them to all female patients, including women who have a high body mass index, are an ovum donor, or have a twin pregnancy. The expanded offering will be available for doctors to order on Feb. 19. 


For more new products and services, please visit the New Products page on our website.

The Scan

Pig Organ Transplants Considered

The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Food and Drug Administration may soon allow clinical trials that involve transplanting pig organs into humans.

'Poo-Bank' Proposal

Harvard Medical School researchers suggest people should bank stool samples when they are young to transplant when they later develop age-related diseases.

Spurred to Develop Again

New Scientist reports that researchers may have uncovered why about 60 percent of in vitro fertilization embryos stop developing.

Science Papers Examine Breast Milk Cell Populations, Cerebral Cortex Cellular Diversity, Micronesia Population History

In Science this week: unique cell populations found within breast milk, 100 transcriptionally distinct cell populations uncovered in the cerebral cortex, and more.