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NEW YORK — Prescient Medicine said this week that it has partnered with Dutch medical research institute Erasmus MC to evaluate its opioid addiction risk technology in a clinical study in the Netherlands.

Prescient offers a tes, called LifeKit Predict that is designed to determine an individual's risk of opioid addiction by analyzing 16 genes in the brain's reward pathway. The assay uses multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid hybridization to analyze DNA extracted from buccal swabs.

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UK Royal Statistical Society is organizing a working group to develop guidelines for assessing COVID-19 tests, the Guardian reports.

The Washington Post reports that the White House chief of staff has asked the US Food and Drug Administration to justify the stricter standards it is seeking for a coronavirus vaccine.

President Donald Trump's "good genes" comment raises eugenics concerns, CNN reports.

In PLOS this week: genetic analysis of tremor condition, analysis of a West and Central African tree used in traditional medicine, and more.

Sep
30
Sponsored by
LGC SeraCare Life Sciences

Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) continues to expand globally to support maternal-fetal patient care. 

Oct
08
Sponsored by
Genecentric

This webinar, Part 3 of the “Advances in RNA-based Biomarker Development for Precision Oncology” webinar series sponsored by GeneCentric Therapeutics, will discuss novel and emerging applications of RNA-based genomic analysis in precision oncology, form characterizing the tumor microenvironment to informing the development of immuno-oncology treatments.

Oct
09
Sponsored by
PerkinElmer

As cases of COVID-19 continued to grow this spring and summer in the US, so too did the number of Emergency Use Authorizations from the FDA for clinical diagnostic tests aimed at detecting current and past infections.

Oct
14
Sponsored by
Inivata

Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) can allow clinicians and researchers to better understand which patients are at high risk of recurrence and should be offered intensified chemotherapy or selected for clinical trials.