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PerkinElmer Acquires Indian Diagnostics Firm

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – PerkinElmer announced after the close of the market on Monday that it has acquired Tulip Diagnostics Private, a provider of in vitro diagnostic reagents, kits, and instruments to diagnostic labs, and government and private healthcare facilities in India.

The company expects the transaction to close in the first quarter of 2017. Further terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Privately held Tulip's products include tests for the prevention, screening, and diagnosis of infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV, and hepatitis, PerkinElmer said, adding that the deal expands its own position in emerging market diagnostics.

"We are committed to expanding our infectious disease screening menu and capabilities, and Tulip's product portfolio, channel access, and broad footprint provide the key enablers to help accelerate our growth in this important market," Prahlad Singh, senior vice president and president of diagnostics at PerkinElmer, said in a statement.

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