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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Microbiome firms Enterome Bioscience and Second Genome today announced that they each have closed financing rounds worth €14.5 million ($16.5 million) and $42.6 million, respectively.

Paris-based Enterome completed a Series C financing round that it said would provide it with additional financing to develop its pipeline of microbiome-related drugs and diagnostics.

The round was led by existing investors Seventure and Lundbeckfond Ventures, and included new investor Nestlé Health Science. Additional terms of the financing were not disclosed.

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