Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Interpace, LabCorp Extend Agreement on Molecular Thyroid Tests

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Interpace Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America today announced that they have extended an agreement for LabCorp to exclusively offer two Interpace molecular thyroid tests.

The agreement, which covers Interpace's ThyGenX and ThyraMIR diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules, commenced in January 2015. The two-year extension will continue the exclusive arrangement until January 2019.

ThyGenX uses next-generation sequencing to identify more than 100 genetic alterations associated with papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, the two most common forms of thyroid cancer. ThyraMIR is the first microRNA gene expression classifier, according to Interpace, and measures the expression of 10 microRNAs. Both tests are covered by Medicare and commercial insurers.

The American Thyroid Association supports the use of molecular tests, such as ThyGenX and ThyraMIR, when traditional cytopathology is indeterminate and unable to differentiate between malignant and benign thyroid nodules. According to Interpace, the ATA estimates 15 percent to 20 percent of the 52,000 thyroid fine need aspirations performed each year fall into this indeterminate category. The combination of both tests can improve risk stratification when standard cytopathology does not provide a clear cancer diagnosis, Interpace added.

"Execution of the initial phase of our arrangement has proven successful, and we are encouraged by recent developments that clearly facilitate the opportunities to work even more closely together in the future," Interpace President and CEO Jack Stover said in a statement.

In addition to ThyGenX and ThyraMIR, Interpace also offers PancraGEN, a test for the diagnosis and prognosis of pancreatic cancer from pancreatic cysts.

In Monday morning trade on the Nasdaq, shares of Interpace climbed around 8 percent to $1.41.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.