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Gates Foundation Awards Multiple Omics, Dx Grants in November

NEW YORK – The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in November awarded more than 250 new grants, many of which are related to omics and diagnostic projects. Following is a selection of notable grants including the project title, awardee, funding amount, and duration:

  • The National University of Singapore was awarded approximately $4.6 million over 26 months for a project entitled "To enhance regional environmental and wastewater surveillance and pathogen genomics in the Asia Pathogen Genomics Initiative network."
  • The Instituto Nacional de Saúde of Marracuene, Mozambique, was awarded $4 million over 37 months for a project entitled "To support integrated disease surveillance in Mozambique."
  • Universitas Padjadjaran of Indonesia was awarded approximately $3.8 million over 42 months for a project entitled "To evaluate and demonstrate how new diagnostics for tuberculosis can improve TB care and control in Indonesia."
  • Flexotronix of Hove, UK, was awarded approximately $2.1 million over nine months for a project entitled "To develop a high-volume malaria rapid diagnostic test for the detection of histidine-rich protein II (HRP-II) antigen and pLDH of malaria in human whole blood to aid in the diagnosis of malaria infection in LMICs."
  • Wits Health Consortium of Johannesburg, South Africa, was awarded approximately $2 million over 23 months for a project entitled "To evaluate the yield from tongue swab as an add-on and/or replacement to routine sputum testing among high TB risk group[s]."
  • Molecular Loop Biosciences of Woburn, Massachusetts, was awarded approximately $1.8 million over 14 months for a project entitled "To evaluate pathogen detection technologies for surveillance of infectious diseases in LMICs."
  • The Institut Pasteur de Dakar of Senegal was awarded approximately $1.5 million over 20 months for a project entitled "To develop a regulatory approved, field-ready measles rapid diagnostic test (RDT) to inform supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) and outbreak response that meets the specificity and sensitivity required by vaccine delivery programs."
  • Institut Pasteur de Dakar was also awarded $499,795 over 17 months for a project entitled "To develop and validate low-cost tools for typhoid surveillance in low-resource settings."
  • The Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science of Germany was awarded approximately $1 million over 37 months for a project entitled "To develop a standardized assay for laboratories to use to test potential vaccines and therapeutics against diseases that affect the world’s poorest populations."
  • Sapient Bioanalytics of San Diego was awarded $688,500 over 24 months for a project entitled "To expand the capability of rapidly identifying metabolites and develop a database which enables discoveries that may translate to new diagnostic tests or inform prevention/treatment of health conditions afflicting vulnerable populations."
  • The World Health Organization was awarded $550,000 over 18 months for a project entitled "To develop standard guidance and low-cost tools for multi-pathogen wastewater and environmental surveillance."
  • The University of Oxford was awarded $497,824 over 4 months for a project entitled "To support the dissemination of key phylogenetic findings in sub-Saharan Africa which inform prevention programs and develop methods for further work."
  • The National Institute of Virology of Pune, India, was awarded $422,275 over 12 months for a project entitled "To strengthen genomic surveillance for vector-borne diseases in India."
  • University of the Western Cape of Bellville, South Africa, was awarded $381,698 over 13 months for a project entitled "To develop international data standards for wastewater environmental surveillance."