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G42 Healthcare, Seegene to Offer Mobile Molecular Diagnostic Labs in Middle East, North Africa

NEW YORK – G42 Healthcare said on Monday that is has signed a memorandum of understanding with Seegene of South Korea to offer fully equipped mobile diagnostics laboratories across the Middle East and North Africa region.

Financial and other terms were not disclosed.

Under the partnership, the firms will offer the Seegene Mobile Station, a laboratory-on-wheels facility for molecular diagnostic testing that includes equipment, RT-PCR reagents, consumables, IT solutions, and technical support. The lab can be transported by ship or land, and be made operational within a few days. It enables users to conduct up to 2,000 tests per day, including for 225 pathogens.

"We are proud to enter into a collaboration with Seegene which offers equitable access to healthcare anywhere in the Pan-Arab region. This is part of our joint efforts with international organizations to share our knowledge and expertise to future-proof the health of nations," said G42 Healthcare CEO Ashish Koshy in a statement.

"With this collaboration, we will join forces to serve the local communities with our expertise and resources. The Seegene Mobile Station will offer the most innovative mobile molecular diagnostic, testing and laboratory services and is part of our commitment to supporting the healthcare community in combating COVID-19 infections, with a broad portfolio of research and development tools and diagnostics," added James Park, Seegene's executive director.

G42 Healthcare, based in Abu Dhabi, is a health tech company that aims to develop the healthcare sector in the United Arab Emirates and beyond using artificial intelligence, scientific research, and technology in genomics, digital health, diagnostics, and clinical trials.

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