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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A new clinical test that identifies disease-specific epigenetic signatures in DNA from blood samples promises to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders that could not be solved by genetic testing and to replace targeted tests for imprinting disorders.

The genome-wide DNA methylation test was developed by a Canadian team led by Bekim Sadikovic at the London Health Sciences Centre. According to the researchers, it is the first test of its kind to become clinically available, though other groups are working on similar assays.

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In Cell this week: analysis of tissue clones, metagenomic studies of ocean water samples, and more.

Forensic genetic firm Verogen has bought the genetic genealogy site GEDmatch.

Researchers have 3D-printed plastic bunnies that encase the information needed to make more such bunnies in DNA, according to Discover magazine.

Dan Rather, the former CBS Evening News anchor and executive producer of a new documentary, writes at the Guardian that everyone needs to know about CRISPR.

Dec
19
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will provide a first-hand look at how a clinical lab evolved its tumor profiling workflow from a targeted panel approach toward comprehensive genomic profiling.  

Jan
28
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss how Moffitt Cancer Center has implemented a new capture-based application to accurately assess myeloid malignancies by detecting complex variants in challenging genes in a single experiment.