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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A plan for regulating laboratory-developed tests that a group of diagnostic manufacturers and labs had penned two years ago has resurfaced in the US House of Representatives with backing from a Republican and Democratic legislator.

Representative Larry Bucshon (R-IN) and Diana DeGette (D-CO) publicly released the discussion draft (see PDF below) of the so-called Diagnostic Accuracy and Innovation Act, which is fashioned closely after a framework developed by the so-called Diagnostic Test Working Group in 2015.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more people get sick and die from drug-resistant germs than previously thought, the Washington Post reports.

According to the Associated Press, three universities and a healthcare institution are sharing a gift of $1 billion.

New rules seek to limit the type of scientific and medical research that can be used to guide public health regulations, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: FreeHi-C approach simulates Hi-C data from interacting genome fragments, and more.

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Fluorescent proteins or self-labeling tags are invaluable tools for studying protein dynamics in living cells using fluorescence microscopy. However, quantitative imaging requires physiological levels of expression of the target protein of interest (POI), especially when stoichiometric interactions of the POI need to be investigated.

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Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss how Moffitt Cancer Center has implemented a new capture-based application to accurately assess myeloid malignancies by detecting complex variants in challenging genes in a single experiment.  

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