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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A research group in Maputo, Mozambique has evaluated a prototype HIV viral load assay from Alere and shown that, while point-of-care testing is tantalizingly feasible, the particular assay is not yet ready for clinical use.

The study was based on an early prototype of the test and Alere has already made significant additional developments, a spokesperson at Alere emphasized in an email to GenomeWeb.

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A new analysis suggests the B.1.1.7 strain of SARS-CoV-2 could be deadlier than previous ones, according to the Guardian.

Moderna reports its vaccine is effective against new SARS-CoV-2 strains, though it is also developing a booster, according to the New York Times.

NPR reports Merck is halting the development of its two candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccines following disappointing Phase 1 results.

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