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Applied BioCode Licenses Magnetic Bead Patents to Douglas for Ag-bio Platform

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Applied BioCode today announced a non-exclusive licensing deal with Douglas Scientific for the development of a high-throughput automation platform for ag-bio applications using Applied BioCode's Barcoded Magnetic Bead technology.

The Santa Fe Springs, Calif.-based company provides Douglas certain patents for its technology, which Douglas will combine with its Array Tape technology to develop a solution "for highly multiplexed assay capability," Applied BioCode said. The instrument system will be able to read an entire 384-well plate and provide up to 9,600 results in less than three minutes, it added.

Financial and other terms were not disclosed.

BMBs are a next-generation digital multiplexing technology that can test up to 4,096 targets from the same sample.

"The combination of Douglas Scientific's Array Tape with our Barcoded Magnetic Beads will provide a powerful nucleic acid testing platform for high volume agriculture companies," Applied BioCode CEO Jerry McLaughlin said in a statement. "We are confident that our license agreement with Douglas Scientific will be a valuable addition to Applied BioCode in the global commercialization of our Barcoded Magnetic Bead technology four future bio-discovery and IVD applications."

Applied BioCode develops highly multiplexed barcoded magnetic beads and analyzer products for molecular diagnostics, bioresearch, and biomarker validation.

Douglas Scientific, based in Alexandria, Minn., is a division of Douglas Machine and develops high-throughput laboratory automation optimized for Array Tape, a flexible microplate replacement "engineered to be a ubiquitous media for high-throughput processing," the company said.

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