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Agilent, Monash Partner to Create Microarray Center in Malaysia

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Agilent Technologies and Monash University Sunway campus today announced the creation of a center to provide training in molecular and genetic studies.

The center, called the Monash-Agilent Authorized Microarray Service Center, will be established at the Australian university's campus outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where it will be equipped with microarray instruments to provide competency training to the center's professionals undertaking research in human disease.

The organizations will share knowledge, including real-time communication of new developments in microarray applications. They will also be able to network with Agilent's global customers.

"The establishment of the AMSC will be a timely boost in the collaboration between Agilent and Monash University Sunway campus through the Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, providing the opportunity to access advanced technologies to strengthen our current genomics research in diabetes, cancer, neurobiology, and infectious diseases," Dato' Dr Anuar Zaini Md Zain, head of the medical school, said in a statement.

"The Monash-Agilent Authorized Microarray Service Center, together with existing platform technologies at the school, such as liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and proteomics, will encourage integrative and multidisciplinary research," he continued. "The center will become the platform to train next-generation scientists in genomics research and potentially spearhead new niche areas in biomedical research through support and networking with Agilent's global customers [and] collaborators."

The partnership, the first for Agilent with a university in Malaysia, is expected to support that country in becoming a leader in life science research and development in Southeast Asia, they said.

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