Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Medical Education Firm Launches Online Tool to Help Docs Guide Personalized Rx Decisions in NSCLC

Premium

Clinical Care Options, a developer of continuing education and medical decision support resources, has launched a web-based tool to help oncologists figure out which lung cancer patients may benefit from molecularly guided personalized treatments.

The online decision-support tool provides oncologists with expert recommendations on first-line and maintenance treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer patients based on their patients' medical information and tumor features, including oncogenic markers.

Clinical Care Options developed the online tool based on the treatment choices made by five US experts who were presented 96 cases with specific variables regarding patients' medical history, such as tumor histology, genomic mutations, age, and smoking history.

In order to use the tool, oncologists select their patients' medical information and desires and select their treatment of choice. The tool then displays how the five experts would treat this patient. The program then surveys users about how the expert recommendations impacted their treatment decisions.

The firm presented the results of this survey in a poster at the Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology this week. The tool has been used by approximately 1,000 physicians around the world, according to Jim Mortimer, senior director of oncology programs and partnership development at Clinical Care Options. Overall, approximately 23 percent of clinicians who used the tool have said it helped change their decisions, while 50 percent indicated the tool helped confirm their initial treatment strategy.

Specifically, with regard to genomically guided personalized NSCLC treatments, all five of the experts selected Pfizer's Xalkori (crizotinib) whenever a patient case involved the ALK fusion gene. However, out of 80 cases entered by oncologists involving this marker, only around 40 percent selected Xalkori. And although in NSCLC cases with mutated EGFR the experts selected Genentech's Tarceva (erlotinib), only 60 percent of the 100 such cases entered by clinicians into the tool chose the drug.

The data collected by Clinical Care Options suggest that its decision-support tool may be a useful resource when oncologists want to assess how their peers would prescribe a genomically targeted personalized treatment. These drugs, compared to standard treatments, are relatively new to the market and expensive. Pfizer's Xalkori was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration last year while Genentech is in the process of getting approval for Tarceva in the US as a first-line treatment for NSCLC patients who have EGFR mutations. Last year, the European Commission approved the use of Tarceva as a first-line treatment for NSCLC in patients with EGFR mutations (PGx Reporter 9/7/2011).

Clinical Care Options said launched the online tool because it noticed that physicians often look for advice beyond broad treatment guidelines when it comes to making decisions for specific patients.

"The tool recommendations align very well with the treatment guidelines but the advantage of the tool is the granularity of the case specifics. Users of the tool can quickly enter in details of a case and see the results for what five experts would recommend," Mortimer told PGx Reporter. "This contrasts with guidelines that apply to broad groups and provide lists of suitable treatments."

Mortimer noted that some of the experts' recommendations included in the tool are outside of the exact indication of a particular drug. However, because the experts' treatment decisions were evidence based, they "did not indicate any issues with reimbursement."

Clinical Care Options has developed a continuing medical education-certified program that includes the tool with educational grants from Genentech and Pfizer.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.