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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Recent studies have continued to explore how genomic technologies can detect cancer in blood samples without identifying specific mutations — by measuring things like the size of DNA fragments, their epigenetic modifications, and other features.

Results from new research suggest that such methods could either serve as an adjunct to tumor DNA mutation assays, making cancer detection easier and cheaper, or that they might be sensitive enough on their own to serve as standalone assays.

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