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Windows Bioinformatics Applications Server, UniProt, ChickGO, Protein3Dfit, Kodak Molecular Imaging Software, Eric Jakobsson, Michael French

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The Computational Biology Service Unit at the Cornell Theory Center has launched the Windows Bioinformatics Applications Server, a collection of bioinformatics applications for the Windows operating system, at http://www.tc.cornell.edu/wba. The site contains free, downloadable open source files for several applications, including Blast, HMMer, Phylip, Primer3, Glimmer, Fasta, and ClustalW.


The European Bioinformatics Institute, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, and the Protein Information Resource have released version 5.4 of the UniProt Knowledgebase at http://www.uniprot.org. UniProtKB 5.4 contains 2,024,194 entries, including 186,882 entries and 67,622,695 amino acids from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot v47.4, and 1,837,312 entries and 584,961,192 amino acids from UniProtKB/Trembl v30.4.


ChickGO, a set of Gene Ontology functional annotations for chicken gene products, is available from Mississippi State University at http://www.agbase.msstate.edu/. ChickGO is part of the larger AgBase project, which aims to build a curated, open-source, web-based resource for functional analysis of agricultural plant and animal gene products.


Protein3Dfit, a web server for protein structure alignment, is available from the Cologne University Bioinformatics Center at http://biotool.uni-koeln.de/3dalign_neu/. Protein3Dfit provides structure-based sequence alignment, an RMSD-table of matching residues, a PDB file of the superposition, and visualization with the Jmol viewer.


Eastman Kodak's Molecular Imaging Systems group has released version 4.0 of its Kodak Molecular Imaging Software for acquisition, quantitative analysis, manipulation, and databasing of scientific images. The software comes with the Kodak Image Station and Gel Logic Imaging systems, and is also available separately for use with other imaging systems. New image-comparison tools include Differential Display for lane-to-lane comparison within an image, and Gel Comparison for band pattern similarity/differences between images.

People in the News

Eric Jakobsson has resigned from his position as director of the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the Chair of the Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative Consortium at the National Institutes of Health, BioInform has learned. NIH has posted a vacancy announcement for the position on its website (http://careerhere.nih.gov/CHPublic/HRShowVac.taf?&VACANCY_uid1=16363), and a member of the NIGMS human resources staff confirmed that Jakobsson has resigned. Jakobsson joined NIGMS in 2003 as the first director of the CBCB.

Prior to joining NIGMS, Jakobsson was a professor in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology and served as director of the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


Michael French has joined Sirna Therapeutics as senior vice president for corporate development. He will report to Sirna CEO Howard Robin. French most recently served as chief business officer at Entelos and has held business development positions at Farma Biagini and Bayer.

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