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Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, have developed a new method to compress genomic data and have demonstrated in a recent paper that the approach can convert a human genome into an e-mailable attachment.

To arrive at their results, the scientists at Irvine's department of computer science and the Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics used a series of compression techniques that enabled them to reduce James Watson's genome from around 3 gigabytes to 4 megabytes, which they say made the data "small enough to be sent as an e-mail attachment."

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Stephen Hahn, the nominee to lead the US Food and Drug Administration, underwent a Senate confirmation hearing yesterday, the Washington Post reports.

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved an RNA interference drug to treat acute hepatic porphyria.

Gizmodo looks over the past decade of consumer DNA testing to find the field to be lacking.

In Nature this week: native RNA sequencing and analysis of a human poly(A) transcriptome, nanopore sequencing-based method to analyze short tandem repeat expansions, and more.

Dec
04
Sponsored by
BC Platforms

This webinar will discuss what it takes to begin realizing precision medicine in a comprehensive clinical infrastructure, with insights from the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine (CCPM).

Dec
05
Sponsored by
Amazon

The discovery of microbial cell-free DNA has propelled the introduction of new technologies that can be leveraged for next-generation diagnostic assays. Previously inaccessible genomic information can now be comprehensively surveyed for microorganisms, all from a single blood draw.

Dec
10
Sponsored by
Congenica II

This webinar will discuss the use of next-generation sequencing and an optimized variant interpretation workflow to increase diagnostic yield in complex clinical cases.

Dec
11
Sponsored by
Roche

This webinar will address how two molecular laboratories are implementing tertiary analysis software to improve their precision oncology workflows.