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Seven Bridges, E-Nios Partner to Automate Biomarker Extraction From NGS Data

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – In an effort to "break the biomarker bottleneck," data-analysis company Seven Bridges Genomics said today that it has entered into a strategic partnership with Greek bioinformatics firm E-Nios, focused on extracting biomarker signatures from next-generation sequencing and multi-omics data.

The companies expect to combine machine learning and physiology to automate at least part of the laborious process of interpreting potential biomarkers. Specifically, they seek to develop "efficient and standardized interpretation frameworks" to sort through complex, voluminous molecular data.

"E-Nios and Seven Bridges share the same vision for data-driven, streamlined computational genomics, integrating all steps from raw data to actionable biological interpretation," Aristotelis Chatziioannou, cofounder and CEO of Athens-based E-Nios, said in a statement.

"E-Nios' technology has the unique ability to combine biological network information with data-driven models," added Seven Bridges CEO Brandi Davis-Dusenbery. "Here, we bring together the technical and scientific strengths of both companies to provide a complete solution for the prediction of biomarker associations from raw data."

Among its other work, Seven Bridges, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, worked with the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to develop the analytics platform being used by the Gabriella Miller Pediatric Data Resource Center's newly launched research portal.

E-Nios is building a business around developing integrated software solutions for identifying and prioritizing gene targets from high-throughput omics data for the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and personalized medicine domains. It spun out of Greece's National Hellenic Research Foundation in 2013 to commercialize a series of computational algorithms and tools developed at the foundation.

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