NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A Scripps Research Institute scientist has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a computer-based design method for targeting RNA in the human genome in order to discover new therapeutics, Scripps said today.

Scripps Research Assistant Professor Matthew Disney, the principal investigator on the grant, has created a computer program that merges information on the interaction between small molecules and RNA folds in the genome that may contribute to human diseases.

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