Cira Discovery Sciences claims that its data-mining technology can bend and stretch to handle biosequence analysis, cheminformatics, and gene expression and SNP analysis. But rather than showcase its proprietary approach in one of these well-established analytical realms, Cira, a Philadelphia-based startup, has chosen the burgeoning, yet controversial, field of proteomics-based diagnostics for one of its first proof-of-principle collaborations. This week, the company announced a collaboration with the Wistar Institute to develop pattern-based diagnostics for lung cancer.

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The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.

Oct
02
Sponsored by
Roche

In the last few years several molecular testing methodologies — such as immunohistochemistry, PCR, and sequencing — have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to aid in the management of patients with lung cancer.  

Oct
11
Sponsored by
ArcherDX

This webinar will discuss a validation study for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay for hematological malignancies (e.g., acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and myeloproliferative neoplasms).

Nov
05
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

With the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), genomes sequencing has been democratized over the last decades with the detection of genomic alterations, thus replacing Sanger sequencing.