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Perkin-Elmer GenScope Builds Application to Monitor Gene Expression

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FOSTER CITY, Calif.--Perkin-Elmer GenScope, a division of PE Applied Biosystems, announced that it is using Persistence Software's PowerTier application server to build a distributed gene monitoring application. The system will allow pharmaceutical companies worldwide to access and analyze critical test results immediately, using Java clients communicating over a secure internet or intranet connection, the company claimed. Pharma-ceutical companies will benefit by being able to speed their ability to bring new drugs to market, said Perkin-Elmer.

Perkin-Elmer added that the gene expression application was built using a three-tier architecture with a thin client, a middle-tier application server, and a relational database. Business processing is performed in a middle-tier Persistence PowerTier; communication between remote clients and the server is via Iona Technologies' Orbix; and the PowerTier uses an Oracle database for storage. Within the middle tier, complex gene expression test results are represented as CORBA components, the company said.

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