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Open Bioinformatics Foundation Selected as Mentor Organization for Google Summer of Code

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Google this week named the Open Bioinformatics Foundation among 150 mentoring organizations for the 2010 Google Summer of Code — a student internship program for open-source projects.

Google sponsors the program, in which students are paid a $5,000 stipend to work as a developer on an open-source project for the summer.

Google said that it reviewed around 365 applications for mentorship organizations and "made some very tough decisions" in selecting the 150 projects in the mentorship list.

OBF is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization that serves as an umbrella group for the BioPerl, BioJava, and Biopython projects. The group also organizes the Bioinformatics Open Source Conference as a special interest group meeting at the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology conference each year.

OBF is collecting project ideas on its Google Summer of Code wiki page, which also includes information for student applicants.

Student applications are due April 9.

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