By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A group of New York-based researchers will use a grant of $3.8 million from the National Science Foundation to continue to develop a plant genomics knowledge resource.
The funding to the New York Plant Genome Consortium will support further development of BigPlant v1.0, a computer-based phylogenetic tree that includes 22,833 sets of genes from 150 different seed plant species, New York University said on Monday.

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The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.

Oct
02
Sponsored by
Roche

In the last few years several molecular testing methodologies — such as immunohistochemistry, PCR, and sequencing — have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to aid in the management of patients with lung cancer.  

Oct
11
Sponsored by
ArcherDX

This webinar will discuss a validation study for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay for hematological malignancies (e.g., acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and myeloproliferative neoplasms).

Nov
05
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

With the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), genomes sequencing has been democratized over the last decades with the detection of genomic alterations, thus replacing Sanger sequencing.