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NIGMS Grant Funds Insilicos' Software Development

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) — Insilicos has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health in order to study a statistical methodology that can be applied to biomedical research, the company said yesterday.

The company will use the roughly $400,000 in funds from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to continue developing a technique called Least Angle Regression, or LARS, which is used to produce stable predictions from data with a large number of dimensions.

"LARS is showing exciting results in life science and other areas," Insilicos CEO Erik Nilsson said in a statement.

Nilsson said the company takes a system biology approach toward disease diagnosis in areas "where we see disease as a breakdown of molecular communication in the body. When you measure this breakdown, you have lots of different signals to choose from, different molecules you can measure. We use LARS as a way of selecting the most promising signals and using these signals to predict disease."

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