Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

MacVector 6.0 Lauded As Most Significant Software Development of 1997

Premium

OXFORD--MacVector 6.0, the latest version of Oxford Molecular Group's popular Macintosh-platform bioinformatics software, has received a 1997 Most Signifi cant Development Award from the Biotechnology Software and Internet Journal, in recognition of its continued integration of internet databases. Journal editor Kevin Ahern noted, "MacVector is charting out new territory where other packages are afraid to tread. We ap plaud the developers of MacVector 6.0 for their commitment to internet molecular biology computing."

Among the key features of the new version of the software that qualified it for the award are extensions to its intuitive interface that shorten the learning curve for new users; internet access to sequence databases that doesn't require database maintenance or the use of a Unix interface; the fact that it provides researchers with all necessary sequence analysis tools in a single package; and seamless movement of information within the package.

Filed under

The Scan

White-Tailed Deer Harbor SARS-CoV-2 Variants No Longer Infecting Humans, Study Finds

A new study in PNAS has found that white-tailed deer could act as a reservoir of SARS-CoV-2 variants no longer found among humans.

Study Points to Benefits of Local Consolidative Therapy, Targeted Treatments in Cancer Care

In JCO Precision Oncology, researchers report that local consolidative therapy combined with molecularly targeted treatments could improve survival for some lung cancer patients.

Genetic Variants That Lower LDL Cholesterol Linked to Reduced Heart Disease Risk

Rare variants in two genes that lower LDL cholesterol are also associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease, according to a new JAMA Cardiology study.

Study Links Evolution of Longevity, Social Organization in Mammals

With the help of comparative phylogenetics and transcriptomics, researchers in Nature Communications see ties between lifespan and social organization in mammals.