Lincoln Stein is a well-known champion of open source bioinformatics software, a fact that earned him this year’s Benjamin Franklin Award in Bioinformatics. The award is presented every year by the Bioinformatics Organization to the person who has “promoted free and open access to the materials and methods used in the scientific field of bioinformatics.” Stein received his award during a ceremony on March 31 during the Bio-IT World Conference in Boston, which he followed with a keynote that strayed a bit from the topic of open source software.

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.

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