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IBM Teams with Australian Group on Life Sciences Computing

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – IBM will collaborate with researchers at the University of Melbourne in Australia to provide life sciences researchers in the area with access to high-performance computing, including IBM's Blue Gene, to conduct a range of human disease studies.

The collaboration will involve IBM's Research Computational Biology Center, the Victorian Life Sciences Computational Initiative (VLSCI), and as many as 10,000 other researchers spread around the Melbourne area.

The VLSCI and IBM research efforts will involve harnessing biological data to improve health and medical care, such as projects in clinical genomics, integrated systems biology, structural biology, and medical imaging, IBM said today.

As the largest of IBM's life sciences collaborations, VLSCI "holds great potential for driving new breakthroughs in the understanding of human disease and translating that knowledge into improved medical care, and gives IBM Research the opportunity to expand the impact of our
Computational Biology Center," IBM Research VP Tilak Agerwala said in a statement.

The joint effort, which IBM is referring to as the "collaboratory" and was made possible through the Victorian State Government, will be fully operational in 2010.

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