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IBM to Provide Computing Infrastructure for University of Calgary Childhood Disease Research

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – IBM announced today that it has formed a five-year partnership with the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine to accelerate and expand genomic research into common childhood disorders.

Under the terms of the collaboration, IBM will install a POWER8-based computing and storage infrastructure, along with advanced analytics and cognitive computing software, at the Cumming School of Medicine's Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute.

This will initially support three research efforts underway at the institute including the further investigation of a genetic mutation linked to autism, a study into the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to childhood conditions, and the genetic causes of stroke and hypertension.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"Advances in our ability to capture and analyze data have truly cross-cutting affects for research programs throughout the university," Ed McCauley, vice-president of research at the University of Calgary, said in a statement. "This collaboration will not only allow researchers to sort through larger data sets and provide advanced skill development opportunities for our trainees, it will increase capacity for genomics work in Calgary."

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