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Human Proteome Folding Project Enters Phase 2

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - The Human Proteome Folding Project -- a collaborative effort between New York University, the Institute for Systems Biology, and the University of Washington -- entered its second phase as of June 23.
 
The project, which initially kicked off in November 2004, runs on IBM's World Community Grid -- an effort to harness spare compute cycles on millions of computers worldwide.
 
The goal of the project's first phase was to understand protein function by predicting the protein structures in more than 150 genomes. The second phase, called HPF2, will focus on increasing the resolution of the predictions for a "select subset" of human proteins, according to the project website.
 
To do so, the project participants intend to refine the Rosetta protein-prediction software in order to account for greater atomic detail.
 
HPF2 will focus on human-secreted proteins and key secreted pathogenic proteins, including Plasmodium, the organism that causes malaria. The project participants said that "higher resolution structure predictions for the proteins that malaria secretes will serve as bioinformatics infrastructure for researchers who are working hard around the world to understand the complex interaction between human hosts and malaria parasites."

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