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GNS Healthcare, Brigham & Women's Collaborate on Adverse Drug Events Prediction

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – GNS Healthcare today said that it will collaborate with researchers at Brigham & Women's Hospital on predicting adverse drug events and hospital readmissions for patients who have been admitted for congestive heart failure.

The alliance will use GNS' Reverse Engineering-Forward Simulation (REFS) platform as well as data from electronic health records of patients treated by the Partners HealthCare system. The partners will attempt to identify hidden, underlying pathways and relationships that lead to adverse events.

GNS will work with David Bates, chief of the division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham & Women's Hospital and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Bates said that the collaboration has the "potential to dramatically increase the quality of patient care while reducing overall healthcare costs."

Cambridge, Mass.-based GNS, which is a subsidiary of VIA Science, said that preventable adverse drug events are estimated to cost the US healthcare system as much as $50 billion a year.

The firm's REFS platform is comprised of "integrated machine learning algorithms and software that extract causal relationships from complex, multi-dimensional data," enabling the simulation of billions of hypotheses that "explore novel unseen conditions and predictions," it said.

GNS recently inked collaborative agreements with Bristol-Myers Squibb to discover new biomarkers and uncover new disease biology related to immune-inflammation and with the National Cancer Institute to help determine what treatments may work best for individuals with non-small cell lung cancer.

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