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GNS to Develop Multiple Myeloma Models with Dana-Farber, Mount Sinai

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – GNS Healthcare will work with researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Mount Sinai School of Medicine to create computer models of multiple myeloma for use in developing new therapies, the data analytics firm said today.

GNS said it will use its REFS (reverse engineering and forward simulation) platform to create network models from next-generation genome sequencing, proteomic, and clinical data.

The results from millions of in silico simulations on these models will provide insights into the biology of multiple myeloma that may enable identification of new interventions for specific groups of patients and development of better treatments, the company said.

"We have made encouraging progress at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in using gene profiling, proteomic, and signaling studies in tumor cell samples treated with existing and novel medicines to get a better understanding of myeloma pathogenesis and to develop novel targeted therapies," Ken Anderson, director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics at Dana-Farber, said in a statement.

"Because of this progress, our team is excited about deploying a powerful, supercomputer driven approach using our multi-layered genomic data to develop computer models to directly define the integrated underlying circuitry of myeloma," added Nikhil Munshi, associate director of the Lipper Center and LeBow Institute.

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