Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

GenoSplice, Institut Curie Partner on Cancer Genomics

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Bioinformatics firm GenoSplice Technology and Institut Curie's Curie-Cancer today said they are collaborating in the area of cancer genomics.

GenoSplice will have access to several Curie-Cancer technology platforms and be included in Institut Curie research programs. In addition to contributing to the development of new oncology products, the collaboration will result in a better understanding of complex diseases through genome mapping, the partners said.

GenoSplice will use Curie-Cancer's genomic technology to offer data processing to its clients in the pharmaceutical space, biotechnology laboratories, and academic research centers.

One project stemming from its collaboration with Curie-Cancer — which is responsible for developing partnerships for Institut Curie — is aimed at defining a genomic map for prostate cancer. The map will be based on data from several hundred patients with the disease with the goal of elucidating the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer and stratifying patients so that physicians can make more informed treatment decisions.

Another project will be directed at a new cell-penetrating peptide molecule. Specifically, the project seeks to identify biomarkers that can help determine which patients may be best responders to the molecule.

In a statement, Pierre de la Grange, scientific director and co-founder of GenoSplice, said, "Participating in research projects with the Institut Curie, which are sometimes multi-party and involve other international research institutes, will put us at the forefront of developments in our areas of interest and will enable us to provide the best possible service to our clients."

GenoSplice is based in Paris and develops services for the analysis of genomic data obtained from sequencing and DNA microarrays.

The partners did not disclose financial and other terms of the deal.

The Scan

Taking Stock of the Stockpile

The US and European countries are evaluating their smallpox vaccine stockpiles as the number of monkeypox cases increases, the Washington Post reports.

Vitamin D From Tomatoes

According to Reuters, researchers in the UK have gene-edited tomatoes so their fruit contains vitamin D.

Cause Not Yet Spotted

NPR reports that a new study was unable to find a cause for persistent long COVID symptoms.

PNAS Papers on Central African Hunter-Gatherers, Myopia Development, Ancient Microtia Allele

In PNAS this week: population patterns among Central African hunter gatherers, effect of myopia-linked gene variant, and more.