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Genomatica Licenses TeselaGen's Software for Microbial DNA Design

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Genomatica has signed a multi-year licensing agreement with TeselaGen Biotechnology that allows it to use TeselaGen's automated DNA cloning software for its microbial strain engineering projects.

Specifically, the partners said that Genomatica will use the software to develop proprietary organisms that will be used to produce chemicals from renewable feedstocks.

The companies also said that they will make enhancements to the software so that it can better meet Genomatica's objectives. TeselaGen offers a commercial cloud-based version of j5, a software package that was initially developed by researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute.

"Genomatica's deep expertise in microbial strain development is very valuable to TeselaGen as we develop our software to solve real problems faced by industrial biologists," Michael Fero, TeselaGen co-founder and CEO, said in a statement.

Fero added, "Our academic roots have given us a firm platform on which to build, but now we're focused on meeting the needs of industrial customers" making this Genomatica partnership "ideal from our perspective."

Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed.

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