Gene Codes Sues New York Over 9/11 Victim ID Software; City Countersues, Calls for Dismissal | GenomeWeb

This article has been updated from a previous version to include comments from a Gene Codes official and an attorney not affiliated with the case.

By Uduak Grace Thomas

Gene Codes is suing New York City's Office of Chief Medical Examiner for at least $10 million in damages for allegedly "violating intellectual property rights" through "contractual breaches" and "misappropriation of trade secrets" related to DNA-matching software used to identify victims in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

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