Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Fluidigm, GenomOncology Sign Data Interpretation Co-Marketing Deal

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Fluidigm today announced it has signed a deal to distribute and co-market GenomOncology's GO Clinical Workbench software for variant interpretation.

Under the terms of the agreement, Fluidigm will offer the software solution to customers for the interpretation of somatic variants identified using Fluidigm's Juno targeted next-generation sequencing library preparation systems.

GO Clinical Workbench is built on a curated database that provides information on variants related to driver mutations, pharmacogenomics, prognosis, and cell-signaling pathways.

"GenomOncology is leading the way in developing easy-to-use tools to streamline somatic mutation profiling and variant reporting," Fluidigm CEO Chris Linthwaite said in a statement. "We look forward to providing these industry-leading tools to our customers and further expanding this combined offering with NGS oncology panels for translational and clinical research."

GenomOncology CEO Manuel Glynias added that the partnership would enable labs to meet the demands of molecular tumor screening and reporting.

Cleveland-based GenomOncology has signed deals to provide data interpretation with several organizations, including Ohio State University, ArcherDx, and Genomics England's 100,000 Genomes Project.

The Scan

Unwrapping Mummies' Faces

LiveScience reports that Parabon NanoLabs researchers have reconstructed how three Egyptian mummies may have looked.

Study on Hold

The Spectrum 10K study has been put on hold due to a backlash, leading the researchers to conduct consultations with the autism community, Nature News reports.

Others Out There Already

Reuters reports that Sanofi is no longer developing an mRNA-based vaccine for SARS-CoV-2.

PNAS Papers on GWAS False Discovery, PRAMEF2 Role in Tumorigenesis, RNA Virus Reverse Genetics

In PNAS this week: strategy to account for GWAS false-discovery rates, role of PRAMEF2 in cancer development, and more.