Collecting Sets of Genes | GenomeWeb

Collecting Sets of Genes

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Many large-scale biology projects make use of a complete set of genes for one's favorite species. Working on such projects for a number of years, we're often reminded that the seemingly straightforward task of assembling a complete list of genes is not so easy, even for our favorite species — human. This article discusses some sources of gene sets, along with the more complex task of assembling complete and correct transcript variants.

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