NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Danish bioinformatics firm CLC Bio said today that it will receive $1.3 million for its participation in a $7.8 million European Commission-funded project that seeks to develop a user-friendly analysis platform for omics data.

CLC Bio said it will support the multinational STATegra project, an effort to create new statistical methods for analyzing a wide range of omics datasets, by making these new methods available through its software packages and by enhancing them with its visualization toolkit.

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