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Cambridge Semantics, ChemAxon Ink Software Integration Agreement

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Cambridge Semantics said this week that it has signed a software integration agreement with ChemAxon that will allow it to integrate the latter's search and visualization capabilities into its Anzo software.

The agreement will provide Anzo customers with tools to search for chemical structures by directly drawing substructures as well as the ability to visualize chemical structures within their Anzo web dashboards. They'll also be able to easily integrate other sources of information with their chemical structure data.

The combined solution will be "a huge benefit to global pharma companies as well as major chemical and agrochemistry companies, biotech enterprises, and academic research centers," Alex Drijver, ChemAxon's CEO, said in a statement.

Pharma customers, for example, could use it to "more easily find all of the papers related to a particular chemical substructure in patent information, publications and other drug research databases," according to Lee Feigenbaum, co-founder and vice president of marketing and technology for Cambridge Semantics. It could also, for instance, help a customer "better locate biotech companies developing an asthma drug in phase 1 or 2 of development that has an active compound matching a particular chemical substructure," he said.

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