Australia's Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative hosts the fastest life science supercomputer in the world, according to the most recent version of the Top500 list released earlier this month.

The 65,536-core IBM BlueGene/Q system, known as "Avoca," clocks in at 690.2 teraflops and holds the No. 33 position on the list of the world's fastest supercomputers, a slight drop from the No. 31 spot on the June version of the twice-yearly ranking.

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A new study in JAMA finds that genetic tests might not be able to determine what diet is right for someone seeking to lose weight.

A genome-wide association study that linked common genetic variants to salivary gland carcinoma risk has been retracted, according to Retraction Watch.

Vampire bats' ability to live off blood is etched in their genomes and gut microbiomes, the Scientist reports.

In Genome Biology this week: peopling of the Sahara, epigenetic reprogramming analysis of liverwort, and more.

Mar
13
Sponsored by
Agilent

This webinar will share how clinical genetics labs can integrate cytogenetics and molecular data to assess abnormalities using a single sample on a single workflow platform.