NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Two research teams from Europe and the US have taken the Oxford Nanopore MinIon sequencer to West Africa to study the Ebola outbreak at its source, allowing them to track down transmission routes quickly with the goal of breaking the chain of infection.

The small size and ruggedness of the MinIon sequencer enabled them to set up shop at their destinations quickly, though the need to upload the raw data for analysis proved challenging for one of the groups.

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Two new Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology studies have largely reproduced the original findings, ScienceInsider reports.

DNA fingerprinting could catch some sample mix-ups at pathology labs, the New York Times says.

In Cell this week: DNA methylation and T cell exhaustion, longevity in C. elegans, and more.

A Maryland police department has turned to DNA phenotyping to develop a suspect sketch, WJLA reports.

Jul
19
Sponsored by
Philips Genomics

This webinar will provide an overview of how liquid biopsies can be integrated into lung cancer care.

Jul
20
Sponsored by
NuGEN

This webinar describes the characterization of gene fusions across distinct subtypes of melanoma.