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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Two research teams from Europe and the US have taken the Oxford Nanopore MinIon sequencer to West Africa to study the Ebola outbreak at its source, allowing them to track down transmission routes quickly with the goal of breaking the chain of infection.

The small size and ruggedness of the MinIon sequencer enabled them to set up shop at their destinations quickly, though the need to upload the raw data for analysis proved challenging for one of the groups.

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