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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The Lassa virus, unlike its Ebola cousin, appears to have ancient origins and its appearances in humans seem to mostly be due to reservoir-to-human transmissions, according to an analysis of some 200 Lassa virus sequences.

"The reason Lassa hasn't yet grown into this huge epidemic is because there is limited transmission between humans," first author Kristian Andersen from the Scripps Research Institute said in a statement. "That's a major difference between Lassa virus and Ebola virus."

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Imperial College London researchers are shifting away from testing a COVID-19 vaccine to focus on combating newly emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants, the Independent says.

According to the Associated Press, genetic genealogy has helped law enforcement officials identify an unknown victim of the Green River Killer.

In PNAS this week: target to reduce chemotherapy-induced cardiac injury, tool finds ancient endogenous RNA viruses, and more.

Moderna reports its vaccine is effective against new SARS-CoV-2 strains, though it is also developing a booster, according to the New York Times.

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