CRISPR/Cas9 Excises HIV From T Cells But May Cause Virus to Develop Resistance to Editing | GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – HIV-1 can acquire resistance to editing by CRISPR/Cas9 in CD4+ SupT1 cell lines, according to the results of a new study, and in fact, it's the mechanics of the Cas9 enzyme that allows the virus to acquire benign mutations that ultimately render gene editing useless.

Led by McGill University Professor Chen Liang, the study's authors showed that while CRISPR/Cas9 can efficiently target and excise proviral DNA integrated in the host genome, gene editing can lead to mutations that allow the virus to persist in some cells.

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