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NEW YORK – Scottish bio-printing firm ArrayJet is looking to repurpose its protein array printing technology for studying SARS-CoV-2.

The Edinburgh-based company is collaborating with proteomics firm CDI Laboratories to print arrays containing synthetic SARS-CoV-2 proteins that can then be used to profile the immune responses of COVID-19 patients, said ArrayJet CEO Iain McWilliam.

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The UK is investing £33.6 million into a controversial human SARS-CoV-2 challenge study, according to Reuters.

The Guardian reports that the UK COVID genomics consortium is monitoring mutations that are arising within circulating SARS-CoV-2 strains for any that may affect future vaccines.

Science reports that Max Planck and Nature have struck a deal for affiliated authors to publish papers that are accessible to the public as well as access Nature-branded journals.

In PNAS this week: genomic analysis of ancient animals from Tibet, oncoproteins tied to WEE1 kinase enzyme inhibitor response, and more.

Nov
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The COVID-19 pandemic created a paradigm shift in modern healthcare, where regulations, protocols, and mindsets had to be reworked in just a matter of months to keep up with the pace of the virus.