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Hybrigenics, Institut Pasteur Expand Proteomics Collaboration

NEW YORK, Oct. 16 – Hybrigenics of Paris and the Institut Pasteur have expanded their collaborative efforts with an agreement to work together exclusively on a project designed to link functional proteomics and infectious diseases.

Under the terms of the deal, Hybrigenics and the Institut Pasteur, which have been working together since 1998, will validate therapeutic targets that can be used in the treatment of infectious diseases. Hybrigenics will have the exclusive right to any results generated by the collaboration.

“Research pursued in this collaboration will make possible wholly new anti-infectives, and make new advances in treating some of the most prevalent and destructive diseases in the world,” Donny Strosberg, CEO of Hybrigenics, said in a statement.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Over the last three years, Hybrigenics has licensed proteomics technologies from the Institut Pasteur and also received information on protein-protein interactions from the French institute. 

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