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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – No longer a rumor, human germline editing with CRISPR/Cas9 is now the subject of a study published today in Protein & Cell. The results indicate that any therapeutic use of the technology in humans remains distant.

Scientists from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, led by Canquan Zhou and Junjiu Huang, used the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system in non-viable human zygotes to modify the gene that causes the hereditary blood disease beta-thalassemia.

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The Hill reports President Donald Trump issued an executive directing federal agencies to cut the number of board and advisory committees they have.

The New York Times reports that researchers are combining tools to more quickly develop crops to feed a growing population and cope with shifting climates.

Scientists in Canada are looking to the UK's plan to sequence children with rare conditions for inspiration, the National Post reports.

In PNAS this week: copy number changes arose during polar bear evolution, genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the Siberian hamster, and more.

Jul
23
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will discuss how the Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma (OUMP) is using a new quality improvement model to support molecular testing of oncology patients. 

Jul
30
Sponsored by
Mission Bio

This webinar will outline a project that performs large-scale and integrative single-cell genome and transcriptome profiling of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases at diagnosis, during drug treatment, and in case of relapse.