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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A short-lived fish from the ephemeral ponds of southeastern Africa is set join the worm, fly, and mouse as an important model organism in research on the genetics of aging. At least, that's the hope of the authors behind a paper published today in Cell, a proof-of-concept that the African turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri) could become an experimental platform.

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The Guardian reports that the Mammalian Genetics Unit at the Harwell Institute is to close.

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Jul
23
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will discuss how the Molecular Pathology Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma (OUMP) is using a new quality improvement model to support molecular testing of oncology patients. 

Jul
30
Sponsored by
Mission Bio

This webinar will outline a project that performs large-scale and integrative single-cell genome and transcriptome profiling of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases at diagnosis, during drug treatment, and in case of relapse.